Cape Place

Cape Place, 1913

Cape Place 1913
© Dorking Museum

Cape Place is situated on the north side of the High Street. Some of the old buildings you can see are still present.  In Victorian times a certain George Wicks lived here. Besides running an umbrella-mending business, he was also the Town Crier.  This meant that he made public announcements, such as election results.

Another of Wicks’ jobs was to declare the start and finish of the Shrove Tuesday ‘football’ match. This was played between young men and boys from the east and west ends of the town. So much damage was caused during this match each year that in 1897 it was declared illegal.

Find the word ‘CHART’ on the house on the right. John Chart was a cabinetmaker and upholsterer. He also had the contract for the burial of workhouse paupers. He owned a ‘pantechnicon’ which he used in the removal of furniture and property. What do you think a pantechnicon was?

Look at the man in the photograph. Do you think this was John Chart and what makes you think that? 

Cape Place, 2015

Cape Place 2015
© Dorking Museum

Cape Place is situated on the north side of the High Street, between Amplifon and the Lemon Tree. Some of the old buildings you can see are still present.  Can you see where the word ‘CHART’ would have been in the older photograph?  What else is missing in the modern photograph? 

Dorking in 1870

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